[PDF] ACRP REPORT 4. Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM

PHOTO: M. A. Coogan.

Figure 3-1. The Oslo Airport Express train was specifically designed for high speeds on this service.

Attributes of Successful Ground Access Systems

PHOTO: http://home.wangjianshuo.com/archives/20030809_pudong_airport_maglev_in_depth.htm.

Figure 3-2. The Shanghai Airport maglev station (left) is directly connected to the air terminal (right) by this pedestrian bridge.

From Shanghai Airport, the exclusive airport bus follows a strategy of serving several areas directly. Seven separate airport bus lines are operated to such destinations as the main train station and the City Air Terminal. Headways for the separate bus services range from 15 to 30 minutes. At a cost of around $7, the maglev service is roughly twice the cost of the airport bus, while still somewhat cheaper than a taxi for one. However, with a party of two, the taxi becomes cheaper than the maglev and directly competitive with the airport bus. The faster maglev attracts only about 6% of the market, compared to 43% for the more direct (and cheaper) airport buses. Market research undertaken in Shanghai shows that people traveling on business had a lower than average use of the maglev, while their use of taxi (25%) was the highest of any market segment. Indeed, the business travelers also had the highest use of the airport bus of any market segment, at 48% mode share. Retired persons had no recorded use of the maglev, presumably because of the price differential. Highest use of the maglev came from “tours” and “visiting friends.” About half of the trips by arriving air travelers involved only one mode; about an equal number involved two modes, the most popular being airport bus and taxi (about 15% of all trips). Without question the low market share gained by the high-speed maglev is surprising. The analysts noted that the higher income markets, like those traveling on business, chose the taxi in spite of the obviously longer travel time to the city edge, at 60 minutes versus 8 minutes. Clearly, the lower income travelers selected the cheaper buses, while the business travelers went for the no-transfer service offered by the taxi. The lack of selection of the maglev-plus-taxi option is puzzling. The implications are clear: the analyst and service designer must be concerned with the door-todoor travel times and the directness of public mode services rather than with the highest speed of the vehicle (reported at 450 km [~280 mph] per hour for the Shanghai maglev). These conclusions are consistent with the Hong Kong experience of the market response to one high-speed rail line compared to a wide variety of more direct bus lines, as discussed below. In both cases, the resident (who is aware of the local options) has a greater propensity to choose the directly routed bus than does the visitor (who is less aware of local options).

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230

Share