[PDF] ACRP REPORT 4. Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM

Understanding the Scale of Airport Ground Access TCRP Report 62 presented an analysis of the U.S. airports and their orientation to public transportation ground access modes, based largely on data collected by the FAA and the Airports Council International (ACI)–North America in the year 1998. In addition, a survey undertaken for TCRP Report 62 drew responses from 33 airports, each of which provided a summary of the 34

The Context for Public Transportation to Major Airports

latest ground access market share. This chapter now presents a summary of how aviation patterns have changed between the analysis years 1998 and 2005. This report includes all U.S. airports with public mode share of 6% or more, which creates a sample of 27 of the most public mode–oriented airports in the United States. For Minneapolis– St. Paul International Airport, the research team was informed that no new survey information had been collected since the opening of the Hiawatha Light Rail. If this information had been available, the research team estimates that a rail mode share of somewhere less than 5% would be augmented by bus/van shares, making a combined public mode share of more than 6%. For the sake of brevity, the sample will be referred to as the 27 most transit-oriented airports in the United States—technically the sample should be called 27 out of 28 of the most transit-oriented airports.

U.S. Airports and Their Public Mode Share In the study of airport ground access, focus on the originating passengers, i.e., those who are not changing from one airplane to another, is critical. However, the scale of the total operations for the 27 airports is also important and is introduced in Table 2-1, which shows the variation in total enplanement: this category includes all aircraft boardings for revenue purposes. The largest airport in the sample, Atlanta, has more than 10 times the total volume of the smallest airport in the sample, New Orleans. And yet volume alone cannot explain the market share gained by public modes of ground transportation, as New Orleans’s well-managed downtown shuttle bus system gains about the same market share (15%) as the combination of rail and bus/van services in Atlanta. The relationship between public mode share and a wide range of geographic factors is discussed in Chapter 3. The wide variation in the growth or shrinkage of total airline passengers for each airport will be discussed in the following section. For clarification, the number in the first row in the sixth column means that the total enplanements at San Francisco International Airport have decreased and are now 83.4% of those in 1998. The number in the second row of the sixth column means that the total enplanements at JFK Airport have increased, and are now 134.5% of those in 1998.

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