[PDF] ACRP REPORT 4. Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM

A Hierarchy of Markets for Public Ground Transportation Services Research has shown that each type of ground transportation service is associated or supported by a roughly defined range of air traveler activity. Using data from air traveler surveys, Table 6-6 lists the size of the primary market associated with the mode and the number of annualized air travelers generated from the primary market area. Express bus service, either from downtown or a regional collection point, requires a market of roughly 1.2 million to 1.6 million annual air travelers. Shared door-to-door modes serve geographic areas generating 2.0 to 4.9 annual air travelers and rail service is found in areas with 6.6 million to 8.2 million annual air travelers. These results provide a general indication of the air traveler activity supportive of public ground transportation services at large airports and point

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Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation

Table 6-6. Primary markets associated with public ground transportation services. Size of primary market for public mode (square miles)

Total annualized origin/destination air travelers (two-way trips)

Rail/Subway

60 – 90

6,600,000 – 8,200,000

Shared Door-to-Door

60 – 450

2,000,000 – 4,900,000

Express Bus (Regional)

275 – 550

1,200,000 – 1,600,000

Express Bus (Downtown)

4

1,300,000

Multistop Bus

75

1,000,000

Mode

SOURCE: TCRP Report 83, MarketSense.

to the role of public transportation modes in the family of ground transportation services needed to support a large airport. Defining the market conditions that support individual public transportation services provides analogous models to use in planning new or improved services for airport ground transportation markets.

Influence of Geography and Demographics on Ground Transportation Markets The previous section reviewed the relationship between geographic characteristics of the market and the market’s ability to support various modes of airport ground access, focusing on the density of the trip ends at the non-airport end of the ground access trip. Building on that analysis, this section examines the interaction of both elements of market research: identifying strong markets in terms of geographic segmentation and demographic segmentation. Initially, the analysis should identify the geographic area where a given service makes sense. Following that assessment, the influence of demographic variables should be undertaken for the defined area. The following example reviews the ground transportation markets in Washington, D.C. The goal is to understand the influence of two separate factors—geography and demographics—on the propensity to select public transportation services. Once geographic conditions are held constant, it becomes possible to isolate the variation in market behavior stemming from the unique characteristics of the four demographic segments.

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