[PDF] ACRP REPORT 4. Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM

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Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation

Chicago, New York, Paris, and Berlin. But, other than these, planning for new capital-intensive rail systems is slowing, with a growing emphasis on management of existing rights-of-way. Chapter 3 reaches the following conclusions: •

In general, while airports need a certain size to support public transportation services, size alone does not explain high ridership. Distance traveled to the airport is worthy of more attention. • In general, the longer the ground access trip, the less competitive is the taxi, and the less attractive is the casual kiss-ride drop-off trip. • In general, directness of the connections on the airport cannot explain the wide variation in mode shares reported in Chapter 2, although there is strong anecdotal data to support the idea that fewer transfers are better than more transfers. • In general, the speed of the public transportation service alone cannot explain the variation in mode share. Chapter 3 makes it clear that no single attribute—such as the speed of the vehicle, the directness of the on-airport connections, or the connectivity to the rest of the public transportation system—can by itself explain the propensity for high market shares. Rather, it becomes evident that a successful ground access system will need to combine various attributes from separate services designed to meet the needs of the separate market segments. Most U.S. airports have at least three market areas: a dense downtown/inner market area; a distant set of dispersed origins, for which dedicated express buses can carry travelers collected by other modes; and a mid-suburban area, where door-to-door shuttle services can be supported.

Public Transportation Market Share by Airport Chapter 4 presents an airport-by-airport summary of airline passenger ground access mode share by public transportation services. Part 1: Best Practices at U.S. Airports In Part 1 of the chapter, the public transportation mode share data for 27 U.S. airports are presented, along with a discussion of trends and patterns for each of the modes. Five categories are used to summarize each U.S. airport: •

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