[PDF] ACRP REPORT 4. Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM

Lessons Learned: Integration with National Systems In the previous examples, whether the integration is with high-speed technology (France and Germany) or slower intercity rail service (Switzerland), the airport strategy takes advantage of a capital investment decision already made for the rest of the national network. The scale of the national rail networks into which the airports have been integrated must be emphasized, because the lack of such rail networks in the United States will make similar strategies infeasible at most U.S. airports. The travel times from the four high-speed lines serving the new Frankfurt Airport InterCity Express station will provide service that is actually competitive with the short-distance air trips that airport officials are trying to discourage. A 1-hour travel time from Frankfurt Airport to downtown Cologne is directly competitive with, and probably better than, the same trip by commuter aircraft. The traveler in western parts of Belgium may be induced to make an international trip through Charles de Gaulle Airport rather than through the Brussels Airport, because of the rail travel times created by the TGV. Designers of U.S. strategies to integrate major airports with Amtrak services will need to understand the difference in quality of services offered to the traveling public. Within the Northeast Corridor of the Amtrak system, it is clear that intercity rail can play a role in bringing people to major airports well connected to that system. Outside of that corridor, the parallels with the international experience are weak at best. What is clear from these examples is that the long-distance traveler is not looking for soupto-nuts provision of integrated services. Most longer distance travelers are showing a pattern in which they want to control as many decisions about their modal options as possible. For the small subset of the market who do want to part with their bags (for whatever reason), third-party baggage managers may emerge as a significant market option. Given that good public transportation options do exist to get travelers to airports—whether from near origins or from longer distance origins, a key challenge is to make the traveler aware of those services. Once that knowledge is widely available, the traveler may wish to retain control of each segment decision, rather than surrendering that control to any service. Chapter 9 will review a series of new breakthroughs in the task of getting information about those options to the traveler at the time of trip planning.

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