[PDF] ACRP REPORT 4. Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM

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Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation

Monorail) and the rail station are part of Newark Liberty International Airport; the AirTrain is operated solely for airport travelers and does not carry any general-purpose traffic. Given the very significant difficulties in establishing full baggage check-in service in New York City, this strategy called for travelers to retain their baggage until arrival at this physical extension of Newark International Airport. The baggage check-in station at the Newark Airport rail station was offered to all airlines, but used by only Continental Airlines’ hub operation. Baggage was accepted at the mezzanine level on the direct path from the Northeast Corridor rail platforms to the AirTrain station itself. The baggage was sent to the ground level on a spiral ramp (Figure 5-8). From this point, the baggage was carried by the airline truck to the airport baggage make-up area. Continental Airlines commenced its baggage check-in service on November 18, 2001. Formally, they requested that baggage be checked 2 hours before departure time, but the staff accepted bags with as little as 45 minutes remaining before departure. Continental Airlines did not charge for the service. What Happened in Newark? Faced with the options of going directly to the people mover or parting with their bags at the rail station itself, about 80% chose to carry their bags to the traditional check-in area of the airport. Continental closed the service in 2003. JFK AirTrain Rail Station The new AirTrain transfer facility at Jamaica Station to the Long Island Railroad (with further connections to the New York City subways) was opened in 2004. The facility includes the

PHOTO: M. A. Coogan.

Figure 5-8. The Newark Airport rail station includes a baggage transfer system, from which Continental Airlines carried the bags by truck to the terminal.

Integrated Baggage and Ticketing Strategies

architectural shell for a check-in facility nearly identical to that adopted by Continental Airlines in Newark. However, from the outset, Port Authority managers knew that convincing the airlines to use the check-in facility would be more difficult because of the lack of a single airline that dominates JFK in the manner that Continental dominates the Newark airport. What Happened at JFK? No airline chose to utilize the shell of the off-airport check-in facility, and it was never opened.

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