[PDF] ACRP REPORT 4. Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM

PHOTO: M. A. Coogan.

Figure 5-1.

The check-in terminal at Paddington Station in full operation (2000).

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Ground Access to Major Airports by Public Transportation

provided, ultimately these airlines grouped as OneWorld, the Star Alliance, and the Swissairbased Qualiflyer Group. (See both TCRP Report 62 and TCRP Report 83 for a complete description of the operations of the baggage-handling system.) The Qualiflyer Group was the first to pull out of providing services at Paddington Station, claiming that the airlines it represented thought the operating costs were too high; shortly after, Swissair collapsed, taking the alliance with it. After September 11, 2001, no U.S. carriers were allowed to check bags on flights to the United States from the facility, which affected services from American Airlines and United Airlines. The major event in dismantlement of the system occurred in 2003 when the flagship carrier of London, British Airways, announced it would depart the system it had championed and advocated (Figure 5-2). After the collapse of services for the British-based OneWorld alliance, the remaining services of the Star Alliance were withdrawn in 2004. Today, the reconstruction of the terminal is complete, releasing thousands of square feet of prime retail space for resale on the market. The Heathrow Express trains themselves are being rebuilt to utilize the front baggage compartments for passenger use. What Happened at Heathrow–Paddington? In cooperation with the Civil Aviation Administration, BAA (the airport operating company) has an extremely thorough process of monitoring and surveying the airport ground access system and its users. Using the original data obtained from the British organizations, the researchers analyzed the change in rail mode share by the four airport ground access market segments. The data allow the observation of the rail mode share by market group before the discontinuation of check-in service, during the discontinuation, and after the conclusion of the discontinuation. The case study mimics the characteristics of an experimental design, as the “longitudinal” data tracks the rail mode share before, during, and after a major intervention. The Results: No Decrease in Market Share. Figure 5-3 shows there has been no visible negative impact on rail ridership on the Heathrow Express attributable to the discontinuation of the

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